In the Art Studio Still Life Painting

Until the end of December, my Monday morning posts are about noticing blessings and things I am thankful for receiving. Due to my schedule this week, I am posting on Sunday instead.

What I am noticing is that I often take action when I am feeling blessed. For example, I am thankful for the local apples and pears we have been devouring over the last couple of weeks. So good! In fact, good enough to want to put a few in a new still life painting.

First, let’s set everything up and take a photograph or sixty just for fun. The painting will be from a different perspective but this gives us the idea…

Pitcher with apples and pears still life by Terrill Welch 2013_10_17 030

Image available for purchase HERE.

Now for the beginning of  the still life painting.

pitcher apples pears under way by Terrill Welch 2013_10_17 089

It is hard to see but the whole canvas has a light wash to tone down the white and then I just begin to find the shapes and colour relations not really worrying about the final result too much at all. Things will change and move around with time and light. The idea is just to get started somewhere.

Working wet-on-wet or alla prima I continue to build up the paint on this roughed in start. The minutes slip by and eventually the painting time can be counted in a few hours…

Pitcher Apples Pears in progess 2 by Terrill Welch 2013_10_17 104

I must quit now. There is a meeting. There is super and then the full moon pushes against the fog and sleep arrives under the night sky. In the morning I push on. I set it to “rest” and have some breakfast. I make a few edits. The day passes into night and I make few more edits on the still-wet oil painting, until …

PITCHER APPLES PEARS on a 16 x 20 inch canvas

Pitcher Apples Pears 16 x 20 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_10_18 166

We now have a study of whites and how they are always leaning towards one colour or another. The tastes, smells and texture of this still life have slid onto the canvas. For this magic of creative process I am thankful.

Now to clean up the studio but before we do, one last shot…

Still Life Pitcher Apples Pears in the Studio by Terrill Welch 2013_10_20 055

Some of the pears and apples have been eaten. The brushes have been clean and the paint on the palette is drying but it is all still here.

May your Sunday be rejuvenating and bring a sense of awareness and comfort.

What blessings do your actions tell you that you are noticing?

© 2013 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

For gallery and purchase information about Terrill’s photographs and paintings go to http://terrillwelchartist.com

The beauty of the lone Tree

There are several trees on the island that I photograph over and over with the hopes to someday catch their essence with my lens. One of these trees is the one in the daffodil field. The tree has set itself in a delightful corner of the world that is often privy to dramatic or at least interesting light. Like the other day when I spotted it with the fog starting to roll up behind its naked trunk and branches.

Lone tree at a distance  by Terrill Welch 2013_01_25 040

So I wiggled my lens in a little closer to see what we could see…

lone tree in field by Terrill Welch 2013_01_25 049

But then I got distracted by its sister tree by the gate.

tree by the gate  by Terrill Welch 2013_01_25 067

By the time I looked back, the mist had really started to drift up behind the other tree.

lone tree  by Terrill Welch 2013_01_25 114

It is lovely of course but is it just right? Can we glimpse the spirit of the tree as it is revealed to the viewer’s eye. No, I think not – not quite. Almost but still I am left feeling unsatisfied. Maybe it is time to tackle it with paint brush and canvas.

Speaking of which, I have several paintings to release this week over at Terrill Welch Artist. The first post went up this morning for a 12 x 16 inc h oil on canvas “Winter Afternoon West Coast Ferry Home

Winter afternoon west coast ferry home  12 x 16 inch oil on canvasby Terrill Welch 2013_01_25 092

Drop on by if it pleases you or subscribe so you are notified of new posts as they go up.

 

What are you attempting to capture this week with you creative tools?

 

© 2013 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

For gallery and purchase information about Terrill’s photographs and paintings go to http://terrillwelchartist.com

 

Unraveling the artistic influences and intentions behind the painting EVENING AND THE ARBUTUS TREE

The time has come to try to write about what happened on the canvas of EVENING AND THE ARBUTUS TREE 36 x 60 inch oil on canvas.

Evening and the Arbutus Tree 36 x 60 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_01_07 018

(Detailed viewing and purchase information available HERE)

We can begin with the first hand experience on the evening of November 10, 2012 and the resulting reference images with the primary one being this one simply called “The Arbutus Tree.”

The Arbutus Tree by Terrill Welch 2012_11_10 036

We can refer back to November 23, 2012 and the early beginnings of this painting, where we can still see parts of the underpainting, and the hard lines of the tree and foreground developing.

Evening and the Arbutus Tree in progress by Terrill Welch 2012_11_23 009

We can examine the six paintings I painted in between this stage and completing the painting on January 4, 2013 for any hints of what was to come.

“Storm Clouds over Strait of Georgia” postcard size oil on paper

Storm Clouds over Strait of Georgia postcard size oil on paper by Terrill Welch 2012_11_29 008

“Evening Thunderclouds over the Strait of Georgia” 20 x 20 inch oil on canvas

Evening Thunderclouds over the Strait of Georiga 20 x 20 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2012_12_20 025

“Reef Bay morning experienced” 14 x 18 inch oil on canvas

Reef Bay morning experienced 11 x 14 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2012_12_20 016

And these three that were painting on the same morning as I returned to work on the larger canvas bringing mostly to completion by the end of the day.

“At the Beach another time” resting 12 x 12 inch oil on canvas

At the Beach another time resting 12 x 12 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_01_02 050

Late December West Coast Sunrise resting 6 x 6 inch oil on gessobord

Late December Westcoast Sunrise resting 6 x 6 inch oil on gessobord by Terrill Welch 2013_01_02 059

Pear Trees in winter first light resting 8 x 10 inch oil on canvas

Pear Trees in winter first light resting 8 x 10 inch oil o canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_01_02 040

We can review my contemporary colleagues whose work is often part of my daily artistic exposure. The list is long with more than 300 in my network but a few may be worthwhile considering in relation to this particular work.

The first of these colleagues being Lena Levin for her skill in using and splitting colours into intricate tensions within her paintings.

Montara Beach 16 x 20 oil on canvas panel by Lena Levin

But there are also Gabriel Boray for his boldness and commitment to exaggeration

The Fields by Gabriel Boray

 

 

Shell Rummel and her attention to design so much so that it is now being made into fabric

Water’s Edge by Shell Rummel

 

This is not everyone of course but just a few of my peers whose landscape paintings come to mind.

Yet, there is also my long-term and recent study and musing of historic landscape works by Emily Carr

The Shoreline by Emily Carr

and The Group of Seven

as well as the landscapes of  Edward Hopper

New York, New Haven and Hartford by Edward Hopper

and Gustav Klimt

Farm House with Birch Trees by Gustav Klimt

Of course, it would be impossible not to mention the French Impressionist painters with particular attention to Claude Monet and Camille Pissarro when listing those whose work I spend time digesting.

Yes, we can do this referring, reviewing and examining of influences and though these are all relevant aspect, they are not the nub of importance. What is, I believe, most important is my conscious effort to divorce the impressionist influences of Claude Monet and the other French Impressionist painters that are so predominantly relevant and internalized in my own painting process. This notice of separation was given on or about August 5, 2012.

However, the intention of my work both in painting and photography has not changed.

What is this intention you might ask. It is roughly as follows:

To demonstrate our relationship to our natural environment and the continuity of time. What is the season? What time is it? Where is the sun? Where am I? Where are you? Where shall we meet in this canvas? How is it intended to influence us?  How does it influence us? The underlying tension is that if we do not address this connection and relationship in a deep and profound way in our daily lives, humanity will parish in a spiral of its own self-destruction.

(Reference: art journal March 21, 2012)

If the intention of my work holds then I must define the problem:

I was taught to start a painting from the farthest point from me. In a landscape this is often the sky. Also, I was to establish my darkest value somewhere in the foreground (though I often forget to do this until part way through a painting). Once the composition is blocked in then, when using oils I was told to work from my darkest areas towards my lightest areas while building the whole painting up at the same time. The reverse process was recommended for water colours for obvious reasons. The intent was to paint what was there or what was seen by following the light source with more detail in the foreground and less in the back ground – a rule I break repeatedly. Further, it was recommended to paint into the shadows in search of colour, light and shapes – noting the difference between cast shadows and form shadows.

But what if this isn’t so? What if even cast shadows are part of form – a continuation of the relationship between visual and energetic space of an object? What if Form is more than Shape, more than composition and cast shadows are part of understanding the elements and there relationships in the painting – beyond position and time of day.

I have primarily set my painting intention on painting light, movement, relationship and connection. Form has been a back drop for the other actors in my paintings. Hence, at times, I have never felt I was successful in providing adequate contrast between light and dark. To be frank, I have trouble seeing the shape or form of shadow even though I understand shadow intimately due to the significant amount of time I spend in natural light. I have had no concept to explore its strength until this idea came to me.

My proposition: The form shadow and the cast shadow are both in a primary relationship with the form. They should be painted and understood as one. Both continue to be attached to our understanding and experience of the Form – and not just with the light source and the underlying subject in the shadow of the form. For example, the grass is NOT understood as grass in the shadow of the tree but rather the tree’s shadow (possessive intentional) is spread across the grass. (Reference: art journal August 5, 2012)

This proposition is what I am exploring in current paintings and this is what is behind the shift we see in EVENING AND THE ARBUTUS TREE. It is this that is the impetus for my primary separation between my impressionist foundations in recent paintings. It is not an approach that consistently holds because I find it is so easy to follow the light into the shadows and represent how it softly plays on the grass instead of letting the shadow stand on its own, sometimes harshly against the light in the evening sky or the edge of the tree trunk. What this painting is saying is that the shadows can speak for themselves in relation to the light land the form. It is a complex language but can intuitively be understood. These harsher edges are part of the stillness that comes with the beginnings of silhouettes that will soon follow as time takes us steadily towards the approaching night. This is an important voice to record in the conversation of this landscape.

In this painting the caste shadow is from the lighthouse. It is this shadow that creates the strongest bridge between the foreground and the mist in the background and the rich hues on the right where the last vestiges of the evening sun are slammed against the sandstone and shrubbery before spilling across the sea and the mist. Therefore, I did not paint a tree that was half cast in shadow. I understood that the cast shadow was important to understanding the form shadow of the tree, of this landscape’s foreground and of its relationship to the background.

detail 1 Evening and the Arbutus Tree by Terrill Welch 2013_01_07 033

These tensions would have become unintelligible if I had followed the light into the shadows to such an extent that the relationship of the caste shadow lost its importance.

So if we can now hold all of these aspects of influences in one brush stroke and then another we possibly might have some idea as to what happened on this canvas that has brought about a notable shift from previous work. Yes, the work, as some have already confirmed, is still recognizable as my painting. It is still following the same intention as earlier work. Yet, I think we might agree that the language of expression has become more refined and complex in its simplification.

What now? Will it mean that this shift becomes consistent in future work? I do not know. If we go back to the previous six paintings that were painted in between starting and completing this painting, I would guess that there will continue to be this flip-flopping between the practice of following the light and that of letting the shadows stand on their own as part of the tension and expression of the relationships in the landscape. We shall have to wait and see.

What are your own most recent attempts to discern your creative influences and intentions?

© 2013 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

For gallery and purchase information about Terrill’s photographs and paintings go to http://terrillwelchartist.com

Evening And The Arbutus Tree – large Canadian landscape painting

As, mentioned I will write more about this painting and the creative process later. For now, we have the painting.

 

Canadian Contemporary Artist Terrill Welch

The sun is going down fast in the late afternoon of November out on Georgina Point, Mayne Island . I marvel at the orange glow and the hues of the heavy mist in the distance of our west coast landscape. I knew then that this most-loved tree was once again going to grace one of my canvases – a large one this time. There is the coolness of a winter sea with soft waves barely evident on the shore. There is a quiet and a peace that often accompanies the end of a day. There is a sense of being alive without separation between land, sea and sky. It is often such with the Canadian landscape but so hard to portray in away that someone who has never been, never stood where I am standing will know what it is I speak about. Yet, this tree knows and seems to…

View original post 264 more words

Photographing and Painting seams in time with John Daido Loori

Mist fills the valley and hugs the side of cliff-face and my heart as lights starts to creep into our day. I am not going to take us to this moment though but to another. It is the one where we have already been in the brightness of the dawn on the first day of 2013.

The sun has not quite broken over Saturna Island and the sky is washed in tangerine and cotton candy. I sit waiting for its arrival next to these palm-size clusters of stones being slowly released by the rain and the sea from their sandstone and clay beds. At this moment, it seems, Time is infinite, the sun will never burn out and I shall live forever.

A Meeting by Terrill Welch 2013_01_01 092

Where are we is often a question I ask without a satisfying answer.

where we are by Terrill Welch 2013_01_01 104

However, John Daido Loori‘s work and writing in The Zen of Creativity: Cultivating Your Artistic Life has certainly taken me further in my exploration in this musing.

“There is no place to search for the truth. Though it’s right beneath your feet, it can’t be found.” – John Daido Loori.

Yet we want to know – the whole truth and nothing but the truth. Instead we must settle for fragments, interpretations and inadequate translations of specifics that will forever escape or fevered inquiring grasp.

Good morning sun by Terrill Welch 2013_01_01 109

Possibly, it is this stumbling to understand that is the appeal of simple mathematics. There is one sun in our solar system. There is one earth. There is one me.

Seams in time by Terrill Welch 2013_01_01 138

“I am always doing that which I cannot do, in order that I may learn how to do it.” – Pablo Picasso

so close by Terrill Welch 2013_01_01 197

I wonder if he too was trying to unravel the mystery of existence? Could it be it is the driving question of creative beings which is then only veiled in texture, hue, shape and expression?

“Everything should be as simple as it is, but not simpler.” – Albert Einstein

Dawn breaks on shore 2013 by Terrill Welch 2013_01_01 253

Which brings us to the idea of “suchness” or “thusness” defined in Zen literature as “a truth, reality, or experince that is impossible to express in words.” John Diado Loori describes it as follows:

It refers to the “that”, “what,” or “it” that is self-evident and does not need explanation. It is essentially being as it is, the all-inclusive reality that is manifested in as a sense of presence… Thusness is the points of two arrows meeting in midair. It is a quality of being that is nondual and does not fall into either side… Suchness is not something added from outside. It is being itself. It is in living life itself. It is the “isness” of a thing, indeed, the isness of existence itself… To bring that sense of thusness into a painting, poem, or piece of music gives it a vitality that is easily experienced, although difficult to pinpoint. It may be only an istant in time, a moment out of the constant flow of life. But to sense thusness and to be able to express it brings it into our own reality.  (p. 141 – 142)

This is the inspiration for my latest large painting ” Even and the Arbutus Tree” which is to wet to share the finished work from yesterday. However, here is an image from an earlier stage for our musing.

Evening and the Arbutus Tree in progress 36 x 60 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_01_03 017

May the moments in your day whisper their presence to you because as we know, the whisper is the easiest to hear.

© 2013 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

For gallery and purchase information about Terrill’s photographs and paintings go to http://terrillwelchartist.com

 

When Resting is more than Sleeping

Do you have nights when sleep comes lightly and yet your day unfolds as a time of rest and renewal? I often have these kinds of days around the full moon. Sleep time is short and yet I do not feel particularly tired. I like to putter and poke at things during these time. This morning I use this hushed time to edit photographs such as this one taken the late afternoon a few days ago on the east side of the Mayne Island.

when rest is not sleep by Terrill Welch 2012_12_27 478

As you likely know, I covet my time in the open space of sea and sky. Its simplicity in the soft light pleases me. While I am editing I take another look at this one…

Mayne Island late afternoon  December 27 2012 by Terrill Welch 2012_12_27 441

There is a quiet here as well that draws me in and keeps me close.

So as the rain fumbles its way to the ground in the early morning gray, I feel at ease. Inside there is a peace and stillness that is reflected in the soft light of my studio lamp and in these photographs.

It is at about this time three years ago that I started our Creative Potager blog. Time has changed its purpose and intent slightly but it is still the place of creative sharing between you and me. It remains a place to visit and connect.

In the coming year I will continue to take you behind the scenes of my photography and painting.  Sometimes I may have question or two for you. Others times a post might be more of a show and tell. Either way, a good visit will commence with each reading and a grand conversations will be had by all. Do drop in unannounced. Do stay as long as you like. And do feel free to jump into the conversation at any hour of the day or night.

 

So as we rest, I was wondering what are YOUR dreams and plans for the year ahead?

 

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

For gallery and purchase information about Terrill’s photographs and paintings go to http://terrillwelchartist.com

Reef Bay Mayne Island observation to painted experience

When do observations transform into renderings of full experiences? This is the question I ask myself while I am gathering references for my next painting. I observe. I take a total of 57 photographs. Though all are important, one later becomes my primary painting reference.

Reef Bay morning observed Dec 7 2012 by Terrill Welch 2012_12_07

What pixels actually hold the smell of the sea and cry of the gulls?

I capture a video just over a minute in length. Later I choose a piece of music to go with it.

At what point in this process of creating a video reference did I move from observing to experiencing?

I return to the studio and rummage through my blank canvases. Eventually, I  choose an 11 x 14 inch and set it upon the easel. I squeeze out the oil paint onto the palette. I listen to the video. I glance at the photograph. I pick up my brush.

Quickly and without hesitation the landscape is blocked in. Swiftly my body engages in the visceral process of painting wet-on-wet. Swish, swish and swish. I move back and forth across the studio to peer at the forms sliding off my brush onto the canvas. I remember the gray dawn with its slimness of colour.  I remember the sea, and the soft rush of water as it comes ashore. I remember the heaviness of the rocks and the salty dampness of winter seaweed. I feel the coolness of the air and the cry of the gulls. Which strokes will hold the promise of a this day? Which strokes carry the sounds and the material weight of substance? Which strokes follow the soft light across the seascape. Oh, how I wonder!

Then it is done.

Too soon my logic bullies. There must be more!

But, two days have passed. I have not touched the canvas, not because technical correction would not lead to a more accurate rendering of the physical setting. Rather I do not alter the painting because nothing more is needed to render the fulness of my experience. It is done.

Reef Bay morning experienced Dec 7 2012 11 x 14 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2012_12_09 069

REEF BAY MORNING EXPERIENCED December 7, 2012 – 14 x 18 inch oil on canvas

Oh, I will photograph it again once it is completely dry and on a brighter day. But the painting of the painting is done. If I want to do more it shall be on another canvas.

What observations are you currently rendering into the fulness of your experience?

It is December 9th today and the great room is in disarray with packages to be wrapped and shipped. It is the time for this artist to begin her holiday break. I shall be back in the New Year to share more painting and photography adventured.

For now, the best of the holiday season to you and yours – one and all!

ONLINE GALLERIES with Terrill Welch paintings and photography include-

Xanadu Studio Gallery for large original paintings

Artsy Home for most original oil paintings currently available

Redbubble for photography prints, greeting cards and posters

Current Local Mayne Island VENUES –

Green House Restaurant – small original oil paintings and photography prints

Farm Gate Store – one large painting

And by appointment at Terrill Welch’s home studio

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

Terrill Welch Artist website at http://terrillwelchartist.com

Terrill Welch Painting and Photography Calendars

A meeting I had scheduled this morning was cancelled. So I have the whole day open ahead of me. I am trying to keep the brushes in the jars because I need to prepare for the next show of small works at a local venue… and for the online Salish Sea Sunday Savings event this Sunday October 28th here at Creative Potager. Thanks to having my paintings now available for purchase online, the event will last for 24 hours this year starting at 9:00 am Pacific Time.

But while you are waiting for me to pull everything together, I am offering a choice between these four calendars at Redbubble. The regular price after Sunday will be $45.00. Right now they are less – much less 🙂

Study of Blue by Terrill Welch

Available HERE.

Mayne Island Tree Spirits by Terrill Welch

Available HERE.

Sea Land and Time Mayne Island by Terrill Welch

Available HERE.

And finally…

Seems To Be by Terrill Welch

Available HERE.

Enjoy! And the best of today to you…. Now where did I put that roll of hanging wire again?

SPROUT: What seasonal creative celebration events are you working on?

ONLINE GALLERIES with Terrill Welch paintings include –

Xanadu Studio Gallery for large original paintings

Artsy Home for most original oil paintings currently available

Current Local Mayne Island VENUES –

Green House Restaurant – small original oil paintings

Farm Gate Store – one large painting

And by appointment at Terrill Welch’s home studio

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

New homes for Art and other studio musings

Yes, a handful of  new photography prints and original paintings  have found homes recently. Let’s have a look at a few of these and just for fun, you can use the voice of the auctioneer as the gavel is slammed down if you like…

SOLD! Extra Large 20 x 26.6 inch Lustre photography print of “Arbutus Strait of Georgia

Prints continue to be available at redbubble HERE.

SOLD! To the lovely buyer in Ontario Canada the 12 x 12 inch oil on canvas seascape “Gray on Gray in Blue.”

SOLD! To the nice couple from British Columbia Canada the 12 x 16 inch canvas print of “Orange Sun on the sea” paintography image.

Prints in various formats continue to be available on redbubble HERE.

Okay, now for the big one. Drum roll please!

SOLD! To the lucky buyer in British Columbia Canada the 36 inch or three feet square “Sea and Clouds” oil on canvas painting by Terrill Welch.

It often takes awhile to find the perfect home for my larger paintings as they are in the thousands of dollars to purchase. But it does happen, eventually. This is the largest in my series of “Squared to the Sea” series and was completed a little over a year ago. I will be sad to see it go but I am happy that it has found the perfect home.

Other paintings currently available can be viewed at the Artsy Home online gallery. And do try out the magnifying glass that is available. Most fun.

 

The past seven weeks have seen me away for from the studio for more than thirty days. My attempted solution of a new iPad with keyboard did not result in keeping us up to speed here at Creative Potager. My apologizes.

Thank heavens for Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus!  Which brings me to some musing and contemplation about the purpose and future of this blog. So many regular Creative Potager readers are also connected to my work on these other social networking platforms which leaves me asking myself this – what unique purpose of intent does Creative Potager fill that is not happening on these other sites? Here are three observations I believe to be true:

1. Posts are easier to find and have a longer shelf-life on Creative Potager.

2. Images are more quickly and likely to show up in an image search when posted on Creative Potager so there is greater exposure of the work for new viewers to find.

3. Creative Potager offers a more friendly platform for longer posts and to profile new work, projects or initiatives.

But the most powerful pull to Creative Potager is it that pleases me to post here! I have a chance to engage with all of you in what feels like a more relaxed-tea-sipping pace than on the other platforms.

So we shall continue in a rather loose, as desired, kind of posting pattern. Yes, subscribing might be best if you don’t want to miss anything. For example, I am starting to plan a new version of the Salish Sea Sunday Savings events to begin before the end of October. These events are not to be missed as they only come around for a few weeks a each year – kind of like these golden plums in a new painting that was released today in the Artsy Home online Gallery…

FRUITS OF LABOUR  is a 12 x 12 inch oil on mounted gessobord – available HERE.

For me, this still life holds the sweet warmth of summer sun and fresh pick fruit. One of my photography clients had asked that I photograph their farm and I have been observing and capturing the golden plums in this painting since they were blossoms on the plum tree. Though I primarily paint land and seascapes, still life and even some figurative paintings will sometimes show up in my work. In fact, expect to see more small still life studies in the months ahead. They offer a nice change from the cooler shades of the sea.

 

SPROUT:  What creative musings are colouring your autumn foliage?

 

All the best of a Canadian Thanksgiving holiday Monday to you!

 

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com

In the PINKS and other rose painting efforts

When I blinked my eyes open just before 5:00 am they met the moon smiling down on us in the soft hues of a clear dawn. I could have gone and got my camera to capture its deep yellow-orange but instead we just gazed at each other until the moment passed.

Now, still early, the day is well underway and I believe with a bit of luck it will be a painting day. Yesterday, in a 20 minute window, I did up this quick 5 x 7 inch study “in the pinks.”

The study is to assist me with what I need to do on a larger 24 x 36 inch canvas “Always Roses” that is in progress.

I wanted to try a new red that I thought might make a better pink for my roses. But I am not sure I am convinced. None the less, my sweetie is taken with this study so I thought I would share it with you.

Each colour has its own learning curve and it seems an infinite set of possibilities as we often discover when we go to paint a wall. I remember watching Mr. Blandings Builds his Dream House (1948) a few years ago and the wife in the movie was trying explain to the painters the colour she wanted in the kitchen or something. She is going on and on about how it was the yellow of fresh butter she was looking for but not quite. She gets more and more specific with her description in her attempt to request the exact colour she is wanting. The lead contractor final turns to his side kick who has the pencil and paper and says “you got that!” The other guy is looking at his paper and nodding as he replies “uh-um, yellow!”

In this painting I feel like the wife in the movie in search of just the right pink and my palette is recording my desire about the same as the guy with the pen and paper in the movie “uh-um pink!”

For the larger painting, I had found the perfect light one afternoon but of course the day I started painting it  is different and my squished studio space doesn’t offer anything close. So I did the best I could in combining my painting day  with the light from the day before. The lighting is completely backwards. However, I wanted to paint so we just went with it.

I decided on an approach of working from the outside in until my subject revealed itself out of necessity. You can get an idea about how this works in these two images.

But is there anything left to say about a still life vase of flowers with roses? After hundreds of years of paintings of this subject it doesn’t seem like there is much. Yet, I cannot resist. I must! In fact all of the other “to do” items have been shoved aside – including getting some food in the house to eat. Well I did find a chunk of cheese and a pear. Not starving – just limited in choices.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I notice now how I shifted the shape of the vase to fit the compositional differences in the frame dimensions I am for the painting. That definitely wasn’t a conscious choice.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let’s see what the painting in process looks like now though the glow of wet paint is making some parts look lighter than what is actually on the canvas. I am fascinated how the image changed perspective so that the viewer is looking slightly down down on the arrangement. This is not the case with my set up. However, the canvas is so tall that I had to reach way above me to paint.

So here is a canvas that rest while humming an old familiar song of roses and other flowers arranged in a vase. It was painted just for the joy of it and to please me. Thanks for tagging along with me 🙂

Now I am off to see if I can find us the perfect pinks and see if I can finish it with some measure of success!

SPROUT: What colour have you most wanted for something and had the least ability to describe?

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

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Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com