Off to kick leaves and have a good visit

It is leaf kicking time! I am heading north for better than week to visit with family. With a bit of luck, I will come back with at least few photographs of brilliant autumn colours. I can’t make a promise but I can assure you that there is a good possibility.

In the meantime, I have been busy with a large stack of administrative work with little time to paint. But I do have a new large 60 x 36 inch oil on canvas resting called SEASIDE MAYNE ISLAND

Seaside Mayne Island resting 60 x 36 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_09_11 048

It is not released yet and still needs a final photo shoot. I will also do a full work-in-progress post for us sometime in early October. Regardless of its newness and still “resting” status, I placed the painting in a prominent location last evening for a dinner we hosted with good friends and collectors of my paintings and photography.

dinner with friends and art by Terrill Welch

The hit of the evening, after SEASIDE MAYNE ISLAND of course, was a new still life painting…

AUGUST STILL LIFE WITH CEZANNE AND MATISSE
36 x 24 inch oil on canvas

August Still life with Cezanne and Matisse 24 x 36 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_08_23 034

There are distinctive elements of Paul Cezanne‘s work that go far beyond his use of colour to represent form. He had a way of presenting different viewpoints in his compositions that was and is exciting. This is something that Henri Matisse continued to explore while allowing the paint to become colour fields of flat surfaces. At one point in the of the development of this work I had a choice. I could continue to build up the colour fields or I could continue to follow the light and movement within the landscape. Matisse of course was arguing for letting paint be paint in its colour and simplicity. Cezanne was slowly working his way into the tension of form and structure of the still life using colour as his guide. I observed. I thanked the masters. Then I picked up my brush and continued to paint the light and movement between the forms until the painting came to rest. Edges are currently unfinished and can be completed to meet your needs.

Detailed view and purchase information at:
http://www.artsyhome.com/product/August-Still-life-with-Cezanne-and-Matisse

Where might be your favourite Leaf-kicking stroll when the golden light is shining low through the trees?

Psst! I have also started working on my second art book. The working title is ANYTHING BUT NEUTRAL: Mayne Island in paintings and photographs, Volume Two. I have about 57 of the estimated 80 pages completed in draft form. Tentative release will be early November. I shall keep you posted as it progresses 🙂

© 2013 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

For gallery and purchase information about Terrill’s photographs and paintings go to http://terrillwelchartist.com

Wanted alive not perfect – still life painting with Paul Cézanne

There is an immediacy to painting still life that is even more evident than when painting landscapes. The subjects are closer to the painter and therefore the light moves even quicker when painting alla prima or wet-on-wet then when painting the sea or the forest using the same method. But it is my favourite way to paint and with the west coast being so perpetually grey this winter, I wanted some colour. So colour we shall have!

I grab some available subjects and pulled them together on the kitchen counter and then I snug my old easel up to it. After roughing it a view lines with paint, I am ready to begin.

defining the canvas space for Wine vase pears lemons and blood oranges  by Terrill Welch 2013_02_09 041

The newsprint is intended to help keep the subject close to us and to provide additional reflected light and lightness to the composition. In the end, as you will see, I let go of some of this in favor of more depth and warmth. With an afternoon of painting large loose brush strokes of delicate colour, we come to about here.

set for wine vase with pears lemons and blood oranges by Terrill Welch 2013_02_09 052

There is something about a still life for the impressionist painter that brings home the need to render it alive rather than perfect. If in doubt follow the light and colour. This is what I tell myself anyway – render the light and get it alive.  It is not my idea but the wise perspective of Paul Cézanne. I set it aside to “rest” and at bedtime it looked something like this.

Wine vase pears lemons and blood oranges resting 12 x 16 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_02_09 072

I mean “something like “because every time I looked at the painting I made an adjustment. While the painting was “resting” I cleanup the still life set up, eat one of the pears and set a blood orange aside for morning. I am not completely happy with the painting yet. There is a lost space on the left that leaves the composition more centered than I would like. I wonder what would Paul Cézanne have to say?

Let’s ask the Web Museum in Paris:

Paul Cézanne, one of the creators of modern art, was called the “solidifier of Impressionism”. And indeed he does not draw his picture before painting it: instead, he creates space and depth of perspective by means of planes of color, which are freely associated and at the same time contrasted and compared. The facets which are thus produced create not just one but many perspectives, and in this way volume comes once again to dominate the composition, no longer a product of the line but rather of the color itself. His still-lifes, in their simplicity and delicate tonal harmony, are a typical work and thus ideal for an understanding of Cézanne’s art.

Most of his pictures are still lifes. These were done in the studio, with simple props; a cloth, some apples, a vase or bowl and, later in his career, plaster sculptures. Cézanne’s still lifes are both traditional and modern. The fruits and objects are readily identifiable, but they have no aroma, no sensual or tactile appeal and no other function other than as passive decorative objects coexisting in the same flat space. They bear no relation to the colorful vegetables of Provence — gorgeous red tomatoes, purple aubergines, and bright green courgettes. In his pursuit of the essence of art, Cézanne had to suppress earthly delights.

(reference: Web Museum Paris at http://www.ibiblio.org/wm/paint/auth/cezanne/sl which includes several images of his still life paintings)

Well, I am not sure I agree that his paintings “have no aroma, sensual or tactile appeal and no other function other than as passive decorative objects coexisting on the same flat  space.” However, he did focus on using planes of colour and small brushstrokes that build up to form complex fields of viewer recognition. This is what I am after in this painting. But I want to be sure the viewer experiences the life and sustenance of the subject. These bosc pears, sweet lemons and blood oranges are ready for eating. Delicious in fact. How do I get past the idea of decorative? How do I create more weight on the left side of the composition? Ah yes, questions to sleep on.

It is morning. I cut up the blood orange. I look at it. My mind goes into a long pause. I pick up the cutting board with the orange slices still on it and climb the stairs to the studio.

Rightly or wrongly, there are now slices of blood orange slid in beside the rest of the fruit in the painting. Of course, as always, when one things changes in a painting there is the need to change a dozen others. So here it is. Finished. Not perfect but still alive I think.

WINE VASE, PEARS, LEMONS AND BLOOD ORANGES 12 x 16 inch oil on canvas

Wine vase pears lemons and blood oranges resting 12 x 16 inch oil on canvas by Terrill Welch 2013_02_10 015

The still live painting’s softness and colour harmony in this morning’s light pleases me. And do have a slice of blood orange. They are delicious! The painting will be released over at Terrill Welch Artist at some point in the future.

What might you be wanting to render alive not perfect?

All the best of Sunday to you and wishing you a marvelous week ahead!

© 2013 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

For gallery and purchase information about Terrill’s photographs and paintings go to http://terrillwelchartist.com

New homes for Art and other studio musings

Yes, a handful of  new photography prints and original paintings  have found homes recently. Let’s have a look at a few of these and just for fun, you can use the voice of the auctioneer as the gavel is slammed down if you like…

SOLD! Extra Large 20 x 26.6 inch Lustre photography print of “Arbutus Strait of Georgia

Prints continue to be available at redbubble HERE.

SOLD! To the lovely buyer in Ontario Canada the 12 x 12 inch oil on canvas seascape “Gray on Gray in Blue.”

SOLD! To the nice couple from British Columbia Canada the 12 x 16 inch canvas print of “Orange Sun on the sea” paintography image.

Prints in various formats continue to be available on redbubble HERE.

Okay, now for the big one. Drum roll please!

SOLD! To the lucky buyer in British Columbia Canada the 36 inch or three feet square “Sea and Clouds” oil on canvas painting by Terrill Welch.

It often takes awhile to find the perfect home for my larger paintings as they are in the thousands of dollars to purchase. But it does happen, eventually. This is the largest in my series of “Squared to the Sea” series and was completed a little over a year ago. I will be sad to see it go but I am happy that it has found the perfect home.

Other paintings currently available can be viewed at the Artsy Home online gallery. And do try out the magnifying glass that is available. Most fun.

 

The past seven weeks have seen me away for from the studio for more than thirty days. My attempted solution of a new iPad with keyboard did not result in keeping us up to speed here at Creative Potager. My apologizes.

Thank heavens for Facebook, Twitter and Google Plus!  Which brings me to some musing and contemplation about the purpose and future of this blog. So many regular Creative Potager readers are also connected to my work on these other social networking platforms which leaves me asking myself this – what unique purpose of intent does Creative Potager fill that is not happening on these other sites? Here are three observations I believe to be true:

1. Posts are easier to find and have a longer shelf-life on Creative Potager.

2. Images are more quickly and likely to show up in an image search when posted on Creative Potager so there is greater exposure of the work for new viewers to find.

3. Creative Potager offers a more friendly platform for longer posts and to profile new work, projects or initiatives.

But the most powerful pull to Creative Potager is it that pleases me to post here! I have a chance to engage with all of you in what feels like a more relaxed-tea-sipping pace than on the other platforms.

So we shall continue in a rather loose, as desired, kind of posting pattern. Yes, subscribing might be best if you don’t want to miss anything. For example, I am starting to plan a new version of the Salish Sea Sunday Savings events to begin before the end of October. These events are not to be missed as they only come around for a few weeks a each year – kind of like these golden plums in a new painting that was released today in the Artsy Home online Gallery…

FRUITS OF LABOUR  is a 12 x 12 inch oil on mounted gessobord – available HERE.

For me, this still life holds the sweet warmth of summer sun and fresh pick fruit. One of my photography clients had asked that I photograph their farm and I have been observing and capturing the golden plums in this painting since they were blossoms on the plum tree. Though I primarily paint land and seascapes, still life and even some figurative paintings will sometimes show up in my work. In fact, expect to see more small still life studies in the months ahead. They offer a nice change from the cooler shades of the sea.

 

SPROUT:  What creative musings are colouring your autumn foliage?

 

All the best of a Canadian Thanksgiving holiday Monday to you!

 

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com

How long did it take you to paint that painting?

 

 

I’m still working on getting that show ready to hang. With a bit of luck I should have it up by this afternoon. This morning I am putting the hanging gear on the last six paintings. Then it is just a matter of pulling the venue consignment sheet together and loading everything up in the vehicle. So while I am sipping on that second cup of coffee I thought I would check in and let you know how things were going.

Art Studio Still Life photograph by Terrill Welch

This brings me to one of the hardest questions I find I ever have to answer as an artist. Can you guess what it is?

How long did it take you to paint that?

The question brings up this jumble of activity that goes into each painting. I know if I start to articulate that list it will either sound like justification or a whine.

Who wants to hear about the years of exploration of one colour – such as blue which I got just right between the sky and the water in this particular painting. Further, it seems unnecessary to explain how it can take several paintings to figure out a particular problem that has been satisfied in this particular painting. Or the days, weeks and months I spent meandering around until I found this particular composition which pleased me enough to pick up my brushes. Of course the trips to town by ferry to buy supplies, no point in mention that either. Then there is the photographing of the finished piece, painting the edges, getting it in the inventory program, posting it on the web and sharing in social media. The actual standing there painting the darn thing was the shortest length of time in the whole process. So I don’t say. Instead I have these rather vague answers that go something like this….

Oh, it took me a couple of months to get it this far – easy shrug.

I have been working on this particular challenge of getting the light to reflect for a while now… seems it worked well here.

If pushed –

The painting itself is actually the fastest part of the process. It is all the background work, preparation and finishing work that takes the time. Not unlike repainting the walls in your kitchen. Then there is the work of getting out there so people know that it exists. That is a whole other story. – big grin.

So there you have it! Thanks for hanging out in my loft studio with me this morning while I do up the last bit of work for the next show at the Green House Bar and Grill right here on Mayne Island.

Well that coffee cup is empty and I really must get to work. Have a nice day all!

SPROUT:  What creative process do you have difficulty explaining?

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com

 

ALWAYS ROSES is a 24 x 36 inch oil on canvas still life painting

Canadian Contemporary Artist Terrill Welch

ALWAYS ROSES is a 24 x 36 inch oil on canvas still life painting

Here are a couple of images of details as well.

and the second one…

I will be finishing the edges on this painting in a few days and then it will be available for purchase with my other work at the online Gallery Artsy Home. I will update this post when the painting is posted. This is a sneak preview for those who follow and love my work. If you are interested in buying this painting and you do not want to wait that long, please feel free to contact me directly.

I haven’t painted flowers in the past few years but I have done so on other occasions. It seems I paint whatever I am involved in during my daily living. For example, this week I painted a scene from the local haying…

View original post 652 more words

PEARS BY THE SEA original oil painting by Terrill Welch

A strange relationship really, pears and the sea. However, it was a joyful occasion on the day they were wedded in my en plein air painting. How did this all come about you might ask?

Well, one day not too long ago I got to thinking how the lovely pear has been painted and photographed for what seems like forever. They are a powerful symbol of abundance, cultivation or agriculture and culture. I want to marry them – at least for a while – with the sea because the sea is, at least for me, a symbol of eternal change and continuity. My desire is to go more deeply into our human relationship to our environment. A study of pears by the sea seems like a good place to start as any.

I set up my easel as the light changed quickly.

It was a grand day by the sea!

As the sea embraces the sky – and my pears of course!

Would you like a peek at the work in progress before I show you the completed painting? Yes? I thought you might…

I may paint another still life of pears by the sea but for now – this 12 x 12 inch oil on canvas is it…

(Updated October 29, 2012: this painting is no longer available)

SPROUT: What is your most favourite unlikely relationship?

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com

AUTUMN BOUNTY and COURTNEY IN THE MOONLIGHT by Sue Wiebe

As promised here are two more original oil paintings on canvas by artist Sue Wiebe.

Learning and practicing how to create depth and shadow is an ongoing process for most of us that apply paint to canvas or paper. COURTNEY IN THE MOONLIGHT provides a direct work out for this artistic muscle.

COURTNEY IN THE MOONLIGHT, 12 X 16 inch original oil painting, by Sue Wiebe

Well done Sue! Exquisite!

Sue painted this next oil painting, AUTUMN BOUNTY, during the time that she was working on WATCHING, the painting of the cougar.  There are only so many hours an artist can paint fur before there is an unrelenting desire to break free. This painting certainly does this in spades.

AUTUMN BOUNTY, 11 by 14 inch original oil painting on canvas, by Sue Wiebe.

I have AUTUMN BOUNTY as my laptop background at the moment and smile every time I sit down to do some work.

Sue, thank you for being our feature artist this week. It is always a pleasure to have you here at Creative Potager. I look forward to seeing your work in person in a week from now. There is nothing like a studio walk and a face-to-face viewing.

Sprout question: What creative muscle are you exercising at the moment?

STUDY OF BLUE  solo exhibition opens Thursday June 30, 2011.

© 2011 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

FromMayne Island,British Columbia,Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com

Everyday objects

Our creative journeys are journeys shared with other creative human-beings. Even if we tend to be reclusive, their presence is with us in our homes, in our everyday objects. A sensual blue image combined with a thought-provoking article Epreuve 05 :: Epreuve d’Artiste :: Altered States by Ian Talbot of London UK, inspired my still life sketch this morning of an everyday object. Thank you Ian.

8″x11″ graphite quick sketch

As I was standing at the counter doing my “awakener” sketch of our medium-sized Bialetti stovetop (Yes it has the little man on it but it is on the other side – I’m left handed. Handles are always on the opposite side of what one usually expects.) I started thinking more about Ian’s article and how I often overlook the creativity and artistic qualities of my favoured everyday objects. Yet, aesthetics and wabi-sabi charm generally influences my choice in the first instance when acquiring the object. Why is it that the creative care embodied in the stovetop coffee maker doesn’t leap out at me before my fingers can grip its black handle? I adore my coffee ritual with a zest that not much else can compete – particularly at 6:00 am. I can see its every detail with my eyes half closed. Well, that is mostly how I see it so that isn’t much of a revelation. However, I think you get the idea….

Though living is often a messy process, simplicity and functionality attract my sense of a world-as-should-be. This simplicity can be in everyday object or in everyday nature as in the image below.

View and purchase full resolution image of “amazement” here.

Sprout Question: When was the last time you recognized the creativity in everyday objects?

p.s. I was interviewed this past week by Stephan Weidner COO of Noomii for coaching blog article “Dealing with your Spouse’s Stroke: Terrill Welch’s Coaching Journey” The interview provides a concise account of how Creative Potager came to be.

© 2010 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.