Worthy of Waiting for Paint to Dry

I’ve heard the marching chant often – “When do we want it?” “Now!” I internalize as meaning something before immediate, something that demands my response, similar to the wail of a newborn. During my internal travels this week, where deeply worn paths of immediacy are noticeable, alongside my restorative practices, I am reminded of these rallying-the-troop cries. Well, try shouting this at an exquisite impasto swipe of hansa yellow. Talk about being promptly escorted over to where the sun doesn’t shine, right next to the raw umber. Okay, maybe too much oil painter’s inside humour voice for pleasant company. But you get the idea. There are two basic approaches with oil paints. The first is to apply and keep applying while it is still wet. The second is to apply and wait for it to dry and then apply some more. This week’s ground on a large  60 X 40 inch canvas is in the second category.

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In fact, there is a serious amount of waiting in this artist’s life. Take that gorgeous brand new hunk of beechwood easel, twenty years of contemplation before I said yes. If I had taken as much consideration with my first two marriages, there would be two less Canadian divorce statistics to count. My reasoning delaying the purchase of a new easel was that I had a perfectly good folding mast easel my parents gave me the year I graduated from high school….. and it wasn’t quite used up yet. I have to admit though that the easel had been repaired several times over the past forty years and was getting bit wobbly at the hinges. But still!

However, this next work finally tipped my scales of reasoning and I broke. My longing and desire forced open my hand from around a large wad of cash and the next thing I knew we are pulling up to the art supply store loading area.

The subject for this next canvas has been studied with regularity for about seven years. There is a particular “story telling” tree from one of our regular walks in Bennet Bay that shall grace this canvas. I know this arbutus tree in my bones.  While I am putting down that red ground I begin curling around the shapes of its branches and trunks, bathed in golden winter light and pushing up against a cobalt afternoon sky. Fifty shades of green skitter across the garish lips of that stretched canvas. But wait. The ground must dry first. Yes, wait, and so must you.

The subject is worthy of the wait. I promise.

While we are waiting, how about taking in a coastal mountain view?

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Or maybe you would prefer to sit with a charismatic tree out on the point?

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Will this do while we wait?

What do you do while waiting for the symbolic paint in your life to dry?

© 2017 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Creative Potager – Visit with painter and photographer Terrill Welch

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

For gallery and purchase information about Terrill’s photographs and paintings go to http://terrillwelchartist.com

No Hard Edges

Some days have no edges as light filters through the morning mist. We may want sharpness, clarity and defined perceptions, but on a morning like this we must trust and wait. I find it is not a hardship really as I notice the coastal mountains in the morning light across the Strait of Georgia.

(image available for purchase HERE

Today is like this as I think about what I need to do before taking a few days off from much of my online community. I have tasks that need to be completed such as sharing my 15 versatile blogger awards following the recognition bestowed upon me by Laurie Buchanan at Speaking from the Heart and Leanne Dyck from The Sweater Curse. I sigh a little in the soft edges of time and when I might follow through. I want clarity but I must wait. It will happen but not for a while.   For now, please do drop in and visit both of these inspiring bloggers and enjoy.

 

SPROUT: What is filtering through the misty edges of you commitments? 

 

Best of the weekend everyone and I shall be in a few days  with a story about my mother’s lipstick. Until then!

 

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com

 

The Coast is Clear

The last few days with stretches of sun have seen for many a photo shoot. Over the next few posts I will share the bounty. Today we shall start with a lovely and way to rare opportunity to focus on the B. C. coastal mountains as seen from across the Strait of Georgia on Mayne Island.

When the coast is clear the Mountains command our attention. It is like a huge surprise and hard to believe they have been their shrouded in clouds all along.

Vancouver high-rise buildings are dwarfed at their feet and compressed in the sliver of space between mountain and sea. If I learned how to “stitch” photographs together I could give you this outstanding string of pearly mountain peaks up and down the coast. But we shall just see it in sections today. Here a Freighter comes into view. This is something that is common for the Strait of Georgia as they head for the Vancouver harbour.

I tried out another black and white for the next image as I find the neutral tones more satisfying in being able to focus on the mountains.

Still, it is a struggle and I am not completely happy with the results yet.  More learning is necessary I think. These grand beasts deserve the best I can give them. However, I enjoy this view of Mount Baker. Her soft profile now graces the background on my computer.

SEED: How does a photographer best capture mountains? This is my learning curve question at the moment. It is not as easy as one might think and I have not got what I am seeking in a photograph yet. So I went on a search and found this great article in the Landscape Photography Magazine by Darwin Wiggett “How to Photograph Mountains

SPROUT: Where is your inner soft mountain grandness showing up today? 

© 2012 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com

Mountain Stands Alone

It was a good weekend for art sales here at Creative Potager but I will tell you more about that later. Right now I am going to share with you how I use photography as study for future painting. When I tell people I sometimes take up to 150 reference images for one painting and that I use them in place of sketches, I can see the confusion slip into the corners of their eyes as they try and understand what I am talking about. Let’s use my fascination with Mount Baker for an example.

In fact, Mount Baker may be the single most motivating factor for me to buy a 70 – 300 mm lens with an image stabilizer. I do alright with my 17-85 mm lens which also has an image stabilizer for most things. But that mountain is too far away from Mayne Island and I don’t think it is going to get any closer anytime soon – at least I hope not.

A photo study of a subject for a future painting is not about standing fixed in one spot taking one shot after another. It is about getting to know the subject in its context. It is about feeling my way into the frame. It is intuitive observation. This is what I call discovering a realism of subject rather than of object. There is a difference and I will expand on this in a future post.

Most times I go back to the same places at different times of day, during different seasons. Each time these memories and images get stockpiled as internal references for the work that will come later with paint on canvas.

I am finding that these studies seem to offer more in-depth of understanding of my subject  than en plein air painting which I had assumed would be the ultimate in painting my subject in its context. This is a surprise to me. Maybe it is that I haven’t done enough en plein air painting recently. I would love to hear from other painters about what their experience as been.

Of this particular photo engagement with Mount Baker, this is my personal favourite frame.

(image available for purchase here.)

I like the soft focused foreground drawing our attention to Mount Baker yet somehow still reminding us that a pile of rocks – is still just a pile of rocks.

So there you have it. A few images from my latest study of Mount Baker and the mountain stands alone.

Oh I didn’t forget – you want to know about the art sales over the weekend.

The first of the large original oil paintings KEEPING WATCH in the STUDY of BLUE solo exhbition has sold to a collector inVictoriaB.C.Canada. This means six of the fifteen paintings in this show are now sold.

Also, large canvas print of the photograph of GOING, a medium canvas print of FOGGED IN and eight cards of photographs and paintings sold to an unknown buyer on redbubble. Thank you whoever you are. Your support and interest in my work is most appreciated.

And thank you to all of you who are part of my creative journey.

Sprout question: What mountain in your creativity stands alone?

STUDY OF BLUE  solo exhibition open until Wednesday July 27, 2011.

© 2011 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

FromMayne Island,British Columbia,Canada

Terrill Welch online Gallery at http://terrillwelchartist.com

Dramatic Seas

What I am about to share with you is from last evening’s meanderings. Can someone please choose a perfect piece of well-known classical music for me?  It needs to start softly as the light gives way to early evening.

(image may be purchased here.)

Then the notes should rise slowly but with confidence.

Building with sweeping sounds as we begin to embrace the clouds over Vancouver…

Going quiet as we come close to the mountains catching the sinking rays of the sun.

Now large sounds that make your heart pound with anticipation! Symbols crash!

(image may be purchased here.)

Building, building until you think you are going to burst….

(image may be purchased here.)

All sounds coming at once… the same notes dun, dun, dun… then releasing you to the Salish Sea.

(image may be purchased here.)

Sprout question: What is drama has your attention today?

© 2010 Terrill Welch, All rights reserved.

Liberal usage granted with written permission. See “About” for details.

Purchase photography at http://www.redbubble.com/people/terrillwelch

Creative Potager – where imagination rules. Be inspired.

From Mayne Island, British Columbia, Canada